Prince Henrik of Denmark will not be buried with his wife Queen Margrethe II

Prince Henrik and Queen Margrethe II of Denmark; Photo Credit – By Holger Motzkau 2010, Wikipedia/Wikimedia Commons (cc-by-sa-3.0), CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10951400

by Susan Flantzer
The Danish Royal House announced on August 3, 2017, that Prince Henrik would not be buried with his wife Queen Margrethe II of Denmark at Roskilde Cathedral in Roskilde, Denmark, the traditional burial place of Danish royalty. The press release read:
The Royal House has announced today that His Royal Highness Prince Henrik does not want to be buried in Roskilde Cathedral, as it had been planned. The Prince’s decision implies that he will not be buried next to Her Majesty The Queen in the sarcophagus that Professor and sculptor Bjørn Nørgaard has prepared. The Queen has been aware of the decision for some time and supports the decision. The Prince’s decision does not change the Queen’s funeral plans. It has been stated in the media that the Prince wants to be buried in France. This is not correct. The Prince still wishes to be buried in Denmark, but the arrangements are not yet in place.
Prince Henrik, born Henri Marie Jean André de Laborde de Monpezat in France in 1934, has been vocal about the difficulties he has experienced as a male consort (a historically female role) in terms of his personal income and his role in the affairs of the country. In April 2016, Prince Henrik renounced the title of Prince Consort, which he had been given in 2005. He retired from public life and decided to participate in official events to a very limited extent.
In 2010, it was announced that Queen Margrethe II had chosen St. Brigid’s Chapel at Roskilde Cathedral as the burial site for herself and her husband Prince Henrik. Danish artist Bjørn Nørgaard designed the double sarcophagus. The photos below are from my visit to Roskilde Cathedral in August 2011 where I was able to see a conservator restoring the 500-year-old murals on the chapel’s walls.

St. Brigid’s Chapel at Roskilde Cathedral; Photo Credit – © Susan Flantzer

Poster describing the sarcophagus of Queen Margrethe II; Photo Credit – © Susan Flantzer

Model of the sarcophagus of Queen Margrethe II; Photo Credit – © Susan Flantzer

Conservator restoring the 500-year-old murals on the chapel’s walls; Photo Credit – © Susan Flantzer

Detail of the mural; Photo Credit – © Susan Flantzer

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